Monday, May 18, 2015

Sidi Saiyyed Mosque, Ahmedabad

At Ahmedabad there are many places that can visit on the tour of the city. The city has many ancient mosques and one such most famous mosque is Sidi Saiyyed Mosque. 



It is the last of the major mosques to be built in the city under the Mughal rule in the year 1573. It is built with yellow sandstone in Indo-Islamic style of architecture. The front of the mosque is very simple with two minarets on the sides of which now only the base exists.



The monument is known for its exquisite ten semi-circular Jhali screens. Each one of these screens are just amazing. The rear wall is filled with square stone pierced panels in geometrical designs. 



The carved latticework windows in the western wall are known worldwide and have become a symbol of the city of Ahmedabad. Depicting a tree with intertwining branches, the carvings look like fine lace filigree work, but are hewn from solid stone.


As attested by the marble stone tablet fixed on the wall of the mosque, it was built by Sidi Saiyyed, an Abyssinian in the service of Rumi Khan, the second son of Khudavand Khan, the Governor of Surat during the 10th Gujarat Sultan Mahmud Shah III.

32 comments:

R Niranjan Das said...

Nice architecture.

Vineeta Yashswi said...

Lovely pictures...

joshidaniel.com said...

nice details :)

eileeninmd said...

Hello, I love the lattice windows, very pretty details. A lovely structure. Have a happy day and new week ahead!

Saru Singhal said...

That a wonderful piece of history. Beautiful pictures.

Gillena Cox said...

luv the ornate detailing

have a good Monday

much love...

Donna said...

The stone carving here is the finest I have ever seen...such an artisan who crafted these....and each is mesmerizing....and out of stone...still amazes me.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Is that a Tree of LIfe in the bottom photo? It is beautiful -- as is the whole place.

Barbara Martin said...

Nice architecture -- the intertwining branches of the trees are much like a person's life. The arches really appeal to me.

Sylvia K said...

What an awesome mosque, Rajesh!! Superb captures for the day as always!! Thanks for sharing!! Have a great week!!

Mama Zen said...

How beautiful!

Laura said...

Such beautiful intricate architecture!

Photo Cache said...

The screens are so artistically beautiful.

Al said...

My jaw just dropped at that latticework, made from solid stone. You've shown some incredible things on this blog but this is one of the most impressive yet.

Chandra Eswaran said...

Beautiful place (palace) and lovely photographs and narration - very nicely done!
Have a Beautiful Day!
Peace :)

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

The tall arches make this building look so impressive, and the delicate carvings on the screens are truly exquisite!

ladyfi said...

That lattice work is so pretty!

Fun60 said...

The skill of those stone masons was phenomenal.

Wandering Wren said...

Wow - I wonder how long that took to make, very impressive architecture.
Wren x

Roger Owen Green said...

The 1st pic reminds me of the undergirdings of a bridge.

ROG, ABCW

Reader Wil said...

I agree with Fun60: The skill of the masons is phenomenal and impressive.
Have a great week.
ABCW Team

Su-sieee! Mac said...

Wow! Just amazing work.
Take 25 to Hollister

Meoww said...

Me too, I cant imagine how they carved the lattice work! Beautiful!

Pietro and Cynthia said...

Such a beautiful Mosque, great architecture.
Wonderful images.

Jarek said...

Nice architecture and beautiful details

MAHESH SEMWAL said...

enjoyed ur post !

Ravish Mani said...

Beautiful capture of lovely art :)

Yogi Saraswat said...

what a beautiful architect .Mughal were rich in this field .

Priyanka Kamath said...

The detail of the lattice work is amazing!

purba chakraborty said...

The curved latticework windows look so beautiful :)

D.Nambiar said...

Amazing lattices!

Antonina Kudina said...

Exquisite architectural details and the most beautiful stone latticework. Enjoyed my visit to Ahmedabad - this mosque was the highlight of my trip.